Editorial Board

 

Editor in Chief

MARK ARONOFF

Trustees Distinguished Professor of Linguistics, Mark Aronoff has been on the State University of New York: Stony Brook faculty since receiving his Ph.D. His research touches on almost all aspects of morphology and its relations to phonology, syntax, semantics, and psycholinguistics.

 

Additional Titles

  • Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences
  • Fellow of the Linguistics Society of America
  • President of the Linguistics Society of America, 2005

 

Recent Publications

  • (2013). Competing iconicities in the structure of languages.  Cognitive Linguistics, 24. 309–343.
  • (2012). Morphological stems: what William of Ockham really said. Word Structure, 5. 28–51.
  • Aronoff, A., Sandler, W., Meir, I., & Padden, C. (2011). The gradual emergence of phonological form in a new language. Natural Language and Linguistic Theory, 29. 503–543.

 

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Editorial Board

ROBIN CLARK

is Professor and Chair of the Department of Linguistics at the University of Pennsylvania.

 

Research Interests

Game theoretic pragmatics; evolutionary game theory; agent-based models of language; change and variation; cognitive neuroscience

 

Recent Publications

  • (2012). Meaningful games: Exploring language with game theory. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press. 
  • Ahern, C. & Clark, R. (2014). Diachronic processes in language as signaling under conflicting interests. In E. A, Cartmill, S. Roberts, H. Lyn & H. Cornish (Eds.), The evolution of language (pp. 99–119). Singapore: World Scientific.
  • (2012). Social coordination and physical coordination. Interaction Studies, 13(1), 66–79. 
  • Troiani, V., Clark, R., & Grossman, M. (2011). Impaired verbal comprehension of quantifiers in corticobasal syndrome. Neuropsychology, 25, 159–165. 

 

 
 

FRANCESCO GARDANI (co-Editor-in-Chief, The Oxford Encyclopedia of Romance Linguistics)

is Senior Postdoc Researcher in the Department of Comparative Linguistics at the University of Zurich.

 

Research Interests

Romance linguistics; morphology; contact linguistics; historical linguistics; linguistic typology

 

Recent Publications

  • Gardani, Francesco (forthc.) Morphology and contact-induced language change. In Anthony Grant (ed.), The Oxford handbook of language contact. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Gardani, Francesco. 2016 Allogenous exaptation. In Muriel Norde & Freek Van der Velde (eds), Exaptation in language change, 227-260. Amsterdam & Philadelphia: John Benjamins.
  • Gardani, Francesco, Peter Arkadiev & Nino Amiridze (eds). 2015. Borrowed morphology. Berlin, Boston & Munich: De Gruyter Mouton.
  • Gardani, Francesco. 2015. Affix pleonasm. In Peter O. Müller, Ingeborg Ohnheiser, Susan Olsen & Franz Rainer (eds), Word-formation. An international handbook of the languages of Europe, vol. 1, 537–550. Berlin & Boston: De Gruyter Mouton.
  • Gardani, Francesco. 2013. Dynamics of morphological productivity. The evolution of noun classes from Latin to Italian. Leiden & Boston: Brill.

 

 

BRIAN JOSEPH

is Distinguished University Professor of Linguistics and the Kenneth E. Naylor Professor of South Slavic Languages and Linguistics, The Ohio State University.

 

Research Interests

Historical linguistics; morphological change; Greek linguistics; Balkan linguistics; Indo-European linguistics; language contact; Albanian linguistics, Sanskrit historical grammar; language sustainability

 

Recent Publications

  • (Forthcoming). "Multiple Exponence in Language Contact Situations: A Case Study from the Greek of Southern Albania." In Contact Morphology, ed. by Angela Ralli. Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Press.
  • (2015). "The pre-history and latter history of the infinitive in Greek and some relevant issues in grammatical analysis." In Linguistic Analysis and ancient Indo-European languages, special issue of In Verbis: Lingua Literature Culture, ed. by Annamaria Bartolotta, vol. 5.1.
  • (2015). "Language Contact." In International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences, 2nd edition. James D. Wright, editor-in-chief. Oxford: Elsevier.
  • (2014). "On arguing from diachrony for paradigms." In Paradigm Change in the Transeurasian languages and beyond, ed. by Martine Robbeets and Walter Bisang [Studies in Language Companion Series (SLCS) 161]. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
  • (2014). "What counts as (an instance of) grammaticalization?" In Refining Grammaticalization, special issue of Folia Linguistica, ed. by Ferdinand von Mengden & Horst Simon, vol. 48.2.

 

 

TARO KAGEYAMA

is Director General at the National Institute for Japanese Language and Linguistics.

 

Research Interests

Universality and language-particularity of the lexicon and lexical knowledge as reflected in morphology, syntax, semantics, phonology, and pragmatics, with particular reference to Japanese, English, and language typology

 

Recent Publications

  • Kageyama, Y., Kishimoto, H., & Sasaki, K. (2015). Valency classes in Japanese. In A. Malchukov & B. Comrie (Eds.), Valency classes: A comparative handbook. Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton.
  • (2014). Word formation in Japanese. Oxford Bibliographies in Linguistics. New York: Oxford University Press.
  • (2013). Post-syntactic compounds and semantic head-marking in Japanese. In B. Frellesvig & P. Sells (Eds.), Japanese/Korean linguistics, 20 (pp. 363–382). Stanford, CA: CSLI.
  • (2012). Variation between endocentric and exocentric word structures. Lingua, 120, 2405–2423.

 

 

YOONJUNG KANG

is Associate Professor of Linguistics at the University of Toronto. She is also the associate editor of Phonology; and the phonology/phonetics section editor of Language & Linguistics Compass.

 

Research Interests

Phonology; phonetics; Korean; loanwords; heritage language; sound change

 

Recent Publications

  • (2014). Voice onset time merger and development of tonal contrast in Seoul Korean stops: A corpus study. Journal of Phonetics, 45, 76–90.
  • Kang, Y., & Han, S. (2013). Tonogenesis in early contemporary Seoul Korean: A longitudinal case study. Lingua, 134, 62–74.
  • (2011). Loanword phonology. In M. van Oostendorp, C. J. Ewen, E. V. Hume, & K. Rice (Eds.), The Blackwell companion to phonology. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.
  • (2003). Perceptual similarity in loanword adaptation: English post-vocalic word-final stops to Korean. Phonology, 20(2), 219–273.

 

 

AYESHA KIDWAI

is Professor of Linguistics at Jawaharlal Nehru. She was awarded the Infosys Prize in the Humanities (theoretical linguistics) in 2013.

 

Research Interests

Generative syntax and semantics; field linguistics; South Asian languages

 

Recent Publications

  • (2000). XP-adjunction in universal grammar: Scrambling & binding in Hindi-Urdu. Oxford studies in comparative syntax. New York: Oxford University Press.
  • (2006). Santali Backernagel clitics. In R. Singh & T. Bhattacharya (Eds.), The yearbook of South Asian languages and linguistics. Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton.
  • (2010). The cartography of phases. In A.-M. di Scuillo & V. Hill (Eds.), Edges in syntax. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

 

 

GARY LIBBEN

is Professor of Applied Linguistics and Psychology at Brock University. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, was Founding Director of the Centre of Comparative Psycholinguistics at the University of Alberta, and President of the Canadian Linguistics Association (2005).

 

Research Interests

The mental lexicon; morphology; compound words; individual differences in the organization and processing of words in the mind; methodological innovation in psycholinguistics

 

Recent Publications

  • (2014). "The nature of compounds: a psychocentric perspective." Cognitive Neuropsychology, 31, 8-25. Libben, G., Curtiss, K., & Weber, S. (2014). Psychocentricity and participant profiles: Implications for lexical processing among multilinguals. Frontiers of Psychology, 4.
  • Libben, G., Jarema, G., & Westbury, C. (Eds.). (2012). Methodological and Analytic Frontiers in Lexical Research. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
  • Libben, G., Weber, S., & Miwa, K. (2012). "P3: A technique for the study of perception, production, and participant properties." The Mental Lexicon, 7:2.

 

 

ROCHELLE LIEBER

is Professor of Linguistics at the University of New Hampshire.

 

Research Interests

Morphology, especially derivational morphology and compounding; syntactic theory; history and structure of English

 

Recent Publications

  • (Forthcoming). English Nouns: The Ecology of Nominalization. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • (2015). Introducing Morphology, 2nd edition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • (2014). The Oxford Handbook of Derivational Morphology. Edited with P. Stekauer. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • (2013). The Oxford Reference Guide to English Morphology. With L. Bauer & I. Plag. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

 

 

MICHELE LOPORCARO (co-Editor-in-Chief, The Oxford Encyclopedia of Romance Linguistics)

is Professor of Romance Linguistics at the University of Zurich.

 

Research Interests

Comparative Romance linguistics; Italian dialectology (phonology, morphology, syntax); historical linguistics; phonological, morphological and syntactic theory; historiography of Romance linguistics

 

Recent Publications

  • Loporcaro, M., Faraoni, V., & Gardani, F. (2014). The third gender of Old Italian. Diachronica, 31(1), 1–22.
  • Paciaroni, T., Loporcaro, M., & Thornton A. M. (Eds.). (2014). Exploring grammatical gender [Special issue]. Language Sciences, 43(1).
  • (2013). Profilo linguistico dei dialetti italiani (2nd ed.). Rome: Laterza.
  • Putzu, I. & Loporcaro, M. (Eds.). (2012). Studies in Sardinian morphology [Special issue]. Lingue e linguaggio, 11(1).

 

 

FIONA MCLAUGHLIN

is Associate Professor of Linguistics & African Language; and Chair of the Department of Linguistics at the University of Florida. She has taught at the Université Abdou Moumouni in Niamey, Niger, and at the Université Gaston Berger in Saint-Louis, Senegal, and is a former director of the West African Research Center in Dakar, Senegal.

 

Research Interests

Language contact in Africa; sociolinguistics of urban Africa; sociolinguistics of writing; historical sociolinguistics; loanword phonology; consonant mutatio; Atlantic languages (Wolof, Pulaar, Seereer)

 

Recent Publications

  • (Forthcoming). Inflection in Pulaar. In M. Baerman (Ed.), The Oxford handbook of inflection. New York: Oxford University Press.
  • (2014). Senegalese digital repertoires in superdiversity: A case study from Seneweb. Discourse, Context & Media, 4–5, 29–37.
  • (Ed.). (2009). The languages of urban Africa. London: Continuum.
  • (2008). On the origins of urban Wolof: Evidence from Louis Descemet's 1864 phrase book. Language in Society, 37(5), 713–735.

 

 

LOUISE MCNALLY

is Professor of Linguistics at Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona.

 

Research Interests

Semantic theory; syntax/semantics/pragmatics interfaces; computational semantics; formal pragmatics

 

Recent Publications

  • (2016). “Modification.” In Cambridge Handbook of Formal Semantics, M. Aloni and P. Dekker (eds.) Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • (2013). "Semantics and Pragmatics." In Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Cognitive Science 4, issue 3.
  • (2012). Telicity, Change, and State: A Cross-Categorial View of Event Structure. (Edited with Violeta Demonte.) Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • (2008). Adjectives and Adverbs: Syntax, Semantics, and Discourse. (Edited with Christopher Kennedy.) Oxford: Oxford University Press.

 

 

JOHN MCWHORTER

is Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University.

 

Research Interests

Language change; language contact; history of English; pidgins and creoles

 

Recent Publications

  • (2014). The Language Hoax: Why the World Looks the Same in Any Language. Oxford and New York : Oxford University Press.
  • (2011). What Language Is (And What It Isn't and What It Could Be). New York : Gotham Books.
  • (2008). Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue: The Untold Story of English. New York : Gotham Books.

 

 

KNUT TARALD TARALDSEN

is Professor of Linguistics at the University of Tromsø and a senior researcher at the Center for Advanced Study in Theoretical Linguistics (CASTL).

 

Research Interests

Syntactic theory, interfaces, Romance and Bantu languages

 

Recent Publications

  • (Forthcoming). "Remarks on the relation between case-alignment and constituent order." In Oxford Handbook of Ergativity, J. Coon, D. Massam and L. Travis (eds.). Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press.
  • (2012). "The structural object position of verbs and nouns." In Functional Heads: The cartography of syntactic structures, volume 7, L. Brugé, A. Cardinaletti, G. Giusti. N. Munaro and C. Poletto (eds.). Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press.
  • (2010). "The nanosyntax of Nguni noun class prefixes and concords." Lingua, Volume 120 (6).

 

 

D.H WHALEN

holds the title of Distinguished Professor at the City University of New York, and is Vice President of Research and Senior Scientist at Haskins Laboratories, Yale University.

 

Research Interests

Phonetics

 

Noteworthy Publications

  • (2015). Whalen, D. H., & McDonough, J. M. Taking the laboratory into the field. Annual Review of Linguistics, 1, 395–415.
  • (2006). Whalen, D. H., Benson, R. R., Richardson, M., Swainson, B., Clark, V., Lai, S., . . . Liberman, A. M. Differentiation for speech and nonspeech processing within primary auditory cortex. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 119, 575–581.
  • (2000). Liberman, A. M., & Whalen, D. H. On the relation of speech to language. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 4, 187-196.
  • (1987). Whalen, D. H., & Liberman, A. M. Speech perception takes precedence over nonspeech perception. Science, 237(4811), 169-171.

 

 

CHARLES YANG

is Associate Professor of Linguistics and Director of Undergraduate Studies in Cognitive Science at the University of Pennsylvania.

 

Research Interests

Language acquisition, processing, and change; morphology and the mental lexicon; computational linguistics; the evolution of language and cognition

 

Recent Publications

  • (2016). Price of Productivity: How Children Learn and Break Rules of Language. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.
  • (2015). "Negative knowledge from positive evidence." Language, 91 (4).
  • (2014). Hauser, M.D.; Yang, C.; Berwick, R.; Tattersall, I.; Ryan, M.; Watumull, J.; Chomsky, N.; Lewontin, R. "The mystery of language evolution." Frontiers in Psychology.
  • (2014). Legate, J.A., Pesetsky, D. & Yang, C. "Recursive misrepresentations: Reply to Levinson (2013, Language)." Language 90 (2).
  • (2006). The Infinite Gift: How children learn and unlearn languages of the world. New York: Scribner's.
  • (2002). Knowledge and learning in natural language. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press.

 

 

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Advisory Board

ANVITA ABBI

is Professor of Linguistics at Jawaharlal Nehru University, President of Linguistics Society of India, and Honorary Member of the Linguistics Society of America.

 

Recent Publications

  • (2013). A Grammar of Great Andamanese language: An ethnolinguistic study. Brill’s studies in South and Southwest Asian languages. Leiden: Brill.
  • (2011). A Dictionary of the Great Andamanese language: English-Great Andamanese-Hindi. Delhi: Ratna Sagar. An interactive English-Great Andamanese-Hindi dictionary of the endangered language of the Andaman Islands with pictures and sounds.
  • (2011). Universal grammar, language evolution, and documenting an ancient language. Language documentation & linguistic theory, Vol. 3. London: SOAS.
 

RUTH BERMAN

is Professor Emeritus of Linguistics at Tel Aviv University, Member of the Israeli Academy of Science and Humanities, and Honorary Member of the Association for the Study of Language Acquisition, Spain (AEAL).

 

Recent Publications

  • (2012). Revisiting roots in Hebrew: A multi-faceted view. In M. Muchnik & Z. Sadan (Eds.), Studies on modern Hebrew and Jewish languages in honor of Ora (Rodriguez) Schwarzwald (pp. 132–158). Jerusalem: Carmel Press.
  • (2011). Revisiting impersonal constructions in Hebrew: Corpus-based perspectives. In A. Malchov & A. Sierwieska (Eds.), The typology of impersonal constructions (pp. 323–355). Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
  • (2009). Acquisition of compound constructions. In R. Lieber & P. Stekauer (Eds.), Handbook of compounding (pp.  298–322). Oxford University Press.

 

 

KERSTI BORJARS

is Professor of Linguistics at University of Manchester and President of the Linguistics Association of Great Britain (2005–2011).

 

Recent Publications

  • Börjars, K., Denison, D., & Scott, A. (2012). Morphosyntactic categories and the expression of possession. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
  • Borsley, R. D., & Börjars, K. (Eds.). (2011). Non-transformational syntax. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Börjars, K., and Burridge, K. (2011). From preposition to purposive to infinitival marker: The Pennsylvania German fer…zu construction. In M. T. Putnam (Ed.), Studies on German-language islands (pp. 385–411). Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

 

 

JOAN BRESNAN

is Sadie Dernham Patek Professor Emerita in Humanities at Stanford University, Founder and Senior Researcher at Spoken Syntax Lab, and President of the Linguistics Society of America (1999).

 

Recent Publications

  • Wolk, C., Bresnan, J., Rosenbach, A., & Szmrecsányi, B. (2013). Dative and genitive variability in Late Modern English: Exploring cross-constructional variation and change. Diachronica, 30(3), 382–419.
  • Ford, M., & Bresnan, J. (2013). "They whispered me the answer" in Australia and the US: A comparative experimental study. In T. H. King & V. de P. (Eds.), From quirky case to representing space: Papers in honor of Annie Zaenen. Stanford, CA: CSLI Publications.
  • Kuperman, V., & Bresnan, J. (2012). The effects of construction probability on word durations during spontaneous incremental sentence production. Journal of Memory & Language, 66, 588–611.

 

 

GREVILLE CORBETT

is Distinguished Professor of Linguistics at the University of Surrey and President of Linguistics Association of Great Britain (1996).

 

Recent Publications

  • Baerman, M., & Corbett, G. (2013). Person by other means. In D. Bakker & M. Haspelmath (Eds.), Languages across boundaries: Studies in memory of Anna Siewierska (pp. 1–14). Berlin: De Gruyter.
  • Chumakina, M., & Corbett, G. (2012). Periphrasis: The role of syntax and morphology in paradigms. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Brown, D. P., Chumakina, M., & Corbett, G. (2012). Canonical morphology and syntax. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

 

 

GERRIT JAN DIMMENDAAL

is Professor of African Studies at the University of Cologne and Honorary Member of the Linguistic Society of America.

 

Recent Publications

  • (2015) The Leopard’s Spots: Essays on Language, Cognition, and Culture. Leiden: Brill.
  • (2011). Historical linguistics and the comparative study of African languages. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
  • (2010). Language description and “the new paradigm”: What linguists may learn from ethnocinematographers. Language documentation and conservation, Vol. 4 (pp. 152–158). Honolulu, HI: University of Hawai'i Press.

 

 

LAURENCE HORN

is Professor of Linguistics and Philosophy at Yale University and Fellow of the Linguistic Society of America and Member of the Yale Grammatical Diversity Project.

 

Recent Publications

  • Horn, L., & Abbott, B. (Forthcoming). (In)definiteness and implicature. In J. K. Campbell et al. (Eds.), Reference and referring: Topics in contemporary philosophy, Vol. 10. Cambridge: The MIT Press.
  • (2013). I love me some datives: Expressive meaning, free datives, and F-implicature. In D. Gutzmann & H.-M. Gärtner (Eds.), Beyond expressives: Explorations in use-conditional meaning. Leiden: Brill.
  • (2011). Etymythology and taboo. Talk presented at ISLE2 (International Society for the Linguistics of English).
 

TARO KAGEYAMA

is Director of the National Institute for Japanese Language and Linguistics, and Editor of the Journal of the Linguistics Society of Japan.

 

Recent Publications

  • (Forthcoming). Japanese. In R. Lieber & P. Štekauer (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of compounding. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • (2013). (Ed.). Lexicon forum, No. 6. Hituzi Syobo.
  • (2012). Diversity and uniformity of grammar: When ungrammatical expressions become grammatical. Journal of Japanese Linguistics, 28, 5–29.

 

 

ELLEN KAISSE

is Howard and Frances Nostrand Endowed Professor at the University of Washington, Department of Linguistics President of the Linguistics Society of America, and Editor of Phonology.

 

Recent Publications

  • E. Kaisse, R. Wright, & E. Henke. (2012). Is the sonority sequencing principle an epiphenomenon? In S. Parker (Ed.), The sonority controversy. Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton.
  • (2009). Sympathy meets Argentinian Spanish. In K. Hanson & S. Inkelas, The nature of the word: studies in honor of Paul Kiparsky. Cambridge: The MIT Press.

 

 

ADITI LAHIRI

is Professor of Linguistics at the University of Oxford, Fellow of the British Academy, Honorary Life member of the Linguistics Society of America, and Fellow of Somerville College.

 

Recent Publications

  • Wetterlin, A., & Lahiri, A. (2012). Tonal alternations in Norwegian compounds. Linguistic Review, 29, 279–320.
  • (2012). Asymmetric phonological representations of words in the mental lexicon. In A. Cohn et al. (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of laboratory phonology, (pp. 146–161). Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • (2011). Words: Discrete and discreet mental representations. In G. Gaskell & P. Zwitserlood (Eds.), Lexical representation: A multidisciplinary approach (pp.  89–121). Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton.

 

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