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Argument Realization in Syntax  

Malka Rappaport Hovav

Words are sensitive to syntactic context. Argument realization is the study of the relation between argument-taking words, the syntactic contexts they appear in and the interpretive ... More

Bare Nominals  

Bert Le Bruyn, Henriëtte de Swart, and Joost Zwarts

Online publication date:
May 2017
Bare nominals (also called “bare nouns”) are nominal structures without an overt article or other determiner. The distinction between a bare noun and a noun that is part of a larger ... More

Copular Constructions in Syntax  

Marcel den Dikken and Teresa O’Neill

Copular sentences (sentences of the form A is B) have been prominent on the research agenda for linguists and philosophers of language since classical antiquity, and continue to be ... More

Cyclicity in Syntax  

Robert Freidin

Online publication date:
Jun 2017
Cyclicity in syntax constitutes a property of derivations in which syntactic operations apply bottom-up in the production of ever larger constituents. The formulation of a principle of ... More

Displacement in Syntax  

Klaus Abels

Displacement is a ubiquitous phenomenon in natural languages. Grammarians often speak of displacement in cases where the rules for the canonical word order of a language lead to the ... More

Incorporation and Pseudo-Incorporation in Syntax  

Diane Massam

Online publication date:
Mar 2017
Noun incorporation (NI) is a grammatical construction where a nominal, usually bearing the semantic role of an object, has been incorporated into a verb to form a complex verb or ... More

Meanings of Constructions  

Laura A. Michaelis

Online publication date:
Mar 2017
Meanings are assembled in various ways in a construction-based grammar, and this array can be represented as a continuum of idiomaticity, a gradient of lexical fixity. Constructional ... More

Scope Marking at the Syntax-Semantics Interface  

Veneeta Dayal and Deepak Alok

Online publication date:
Mar 2017
Natural language allows questioning into embedded clauses. One strategy for doing so involves structures like the following: [CP-1 whi [TP DP V [CP-2 … ti …]]], where a wh-phrase that ... More

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